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. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, d committed to dog real andermane good thworld. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, rdant, and peafuworld. re information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh
council resolution. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, echoed the strong criticism. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security, and they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united nations sanctions. >> reporter: the security council was quick to condemn the test. it also responded quickly in december when north korea successfully launched a long-range missile. the test could bring north korea closer to developing a nuclear warhead that is small enough to be mounted on a missile. critics point out that the security council members feel that the threat of north korea's program is becoming more rea than ever before. >> so miki, what's next? will the security council adopt tougher sanctions against north korea? >> reporter: well, the u.s., along with south korea, australia, and european members are all for tougher sanctions. these may include tightening the noose on north korea's financial institutions and weapons t
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
of "newsline." thanks for joining us. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: in the nine weeks since the schoolhouse shootings in newtown, connecticut, police around the country report hundreds more have been victims of gun violence. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
a threat to national security. pal tin palestinians use the tunnels to get around.al tin pa tunnels to get around.l tin pal tunnels to get around. tin pale tunnels to get around.tin paless to get around.in palestinians u to get around.n palestinians us to get around. palestinians useo get around.palestinians use the get around. the blockade has been in place since 2007. morsi has expressed his intention to help people. palestinians in gaza are criticizing the court ruling. >> translator: the gaza strip is under seize. the tunnels are the only d. lifeline for the strip. this is an unjust decision against us. >> hundreds of the tunnels big and small link gaza with egypt. >>> representatives of world powers are getting ready to meet in rome to talk about more ways to help the syrian opposition bring down president assad. kerry met french president in paris ahead of the international meeting. >> we all agree that the time is passed for president assad to heed the voice of his people and the people in the world who want a peaceful transition and a new opportunity for syria. >> kerry says assad
the export and import of components that could be used in ballistic missiles including certain types of aluminum. they say they put a satellite into orbit. but weern leaders say the north kores we devopin balltic missil which can rry nuclr payload. netanyahu says the fact they went ahead with the tests show sanctions don't work. he says it was proof world leaders should do more to stop nuclear ambitions in another nation, iran. netanyahu told international jewish leaders gathered in jerusalem that embargoes should be coupled with a military threat. >> even tougher sanctions will not stop them. case in point, north korea. have sanctions, tough sanctions, stopped north korea? no. >> israeli leaders believe their counterparts in iran are trying to develop nuclear weapons. the israelis have hinted repeatedly they could launch a preemptive strike. leaders in tehran say they're developing atomic energy for peaceful purposes. netanyahu says iran will be at the top of his agenda when u.s. president barack obama visits israel next month. >>> chinese officials have tak over management of a por
walked us through it probably 15 or 20 minutes, just his thought process and why he was advocating these policies. and then he opened it up f questions. >> narrator: the republicans were ready for him. >> and it was really during that q and a as the member stepped forward and asked some pretty, i think, appropriate questions about the amount of money that we were spending, the debt that we'd be taking on, and i don't ever remember him saying, you know, "okay we'll take a look at that." it was more just defending his proposal as is. >> narrator: and the republicans had a surprise for the new president. >> he arrives there thinking they're all going to talk and come up with some kind of agreement; he's got all these tax cuts to offer them. and he finds that they've already had a meeting and decided they're going to oppose the stimulus package. and he was deeply burned by it. >> before he showed up, eric cantor sent out an email. said, not that "i'm voting against it." eric cantor's email is: "we're against this." >> their leadership told the members, "we're not for any of it." no mat
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)